Category Archive Slider Content

By

This Organ Donation Week we’re encouraging families to get together and talk about organ donation

Although the law around organ donation has changed to an opt-out system for adults in England, Wales and Scotland, your family will still be consulted if organ donation is a possibility.

Your family can overturn your decision if they aren’t sure what you want, but 9 in 10 families support organ donation going ahead when they know that’s what their loved ones had wanted.

We’re encouraging everyone in the family – no matter what age – to start talking about organ donation. Even if you’re not sure if you want to donate, having that conversation might help you make up your mind.

Find out more about Organ Donation at Organdonation.nhs.uk 

By

This week is Sexual Health Week

This week is Sexual Health Week. If you have any worries, concerns, or questions there is advice and support including what symptoms to look out for and when you should see your GP, available at https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/.

By

Worried about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding?

If you are feeling worried or anxious about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding, there is support and advice available for you.

Breast Cancer Now have nurses available to answer your questions via their free Helpline 0808 800 6000 or you can find out more about signs and symptoms on their website https://breastcancernow.org/…/signs-symptoms-breast-cancer

You can also find advice at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer/symptoms/

If you notice any symptoms of breast cancer, such as an unusual lump in your breast or any change in the appearance, feel or shape of your breasts book an appointment to see your GP asap.

The GP will examine you. If they think your symptoms need further assessment, they’ll refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic.

By

Migraine Awareness Week

This week is Migraine Awareness Week and aims to raise awareness of the condition and highlight the impact it has to people living with it.

A migraine is usually a moderate or severe headache felt as a throbbing pain on one side of the head. Many people have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and increased sensitivity to light or sound.

Migraine is a common health condition affecting around one in every five women and around one in every 15 men. They usually begin in early adulthood.

Simple painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen can be effective for migraine. However, be careful not to take too many painkillers as this could make it harder to treat headaches over time.

You should make an appointment to see your GP if you have frequent migraines (on more than five days a month), even if they can be controlled with medication, as you may benefit from preventative treatment.

More information on migraines can be found at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/migraine/

By

World Alzheimer’s Month

This year’s World Alzheimer’s Month is focussing on dementia, highlighting the importance of talking about dementia and raising awareness of how it impacts the daily lives of people affected by the condition.

We know that receiving a dementia diagnosis can leave a person feeling very alone. We have also spoken to primary carers who feel isolated since their loved one received a diagnosis. But you are not alone – there is support available to anyone who is affected by or worried about dementia. You can find information, guidance and support at:

NHS.UK

The Alzheimer’s Society

By

Important Information: Blood Tests

A supplier to the NHS has advised us of a global shortage of some equipment used for taking blood tests.

Anyone who needs a test for urgent health problems, will still get one but where your clinician recommends that it’s safe to do so, then you may be asked to come back for a test at a later date, or your appointment may be rescheduled.

Given the nature of the shortage, we cannot give an exact date for when the test will be rescheduled, but please be assured that if your condition or symptoms require it, then you will get a test, and we will be re-booking your test when supplies become more easily available.

If your condition or symptoms change or get worse, please contact the NHS as you would normally.

By

Make your choice

Find information about opting out of sharing your data with the NHS and what you need to know:

Make your choice about sharing data from your health records – NHS (www.nhs.uk).

By

Demonstrating your COVID-19 vaccination status when travelling abroad

Please visit the gov.uk website for information on how to demonstrate your coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination status to show that you’ve had the full course of the COVID-19 vaccine and access this status when travelling abroad.

Please DO NOT contact your GP surgery about your COVID-19 vaccination status. GPs cannot provide letters showing your COVID-19 vaccination status. Thank you.

By

Patients recovering from Covid-19 required for plasma donation to save lives!

NHS Blood and Transplant are leading an urgent programme to enable a UK trial that could produce vital treatment for Covid-19 and help save more lives.

This treatment requires plasma donations from patients who have had COVID-19 and are now recovering. NHS Blood and Transplant need to collect high titre plasma from willing donors to see if this might benefit when used early on in a patient’s illness, before hospitalisation and are in particular need of recovering male patients aged 18 – 65 years to take part.

To take part in this vital programme, you can call: 0300 123 2323 or visit https://www.nhsbt.nhs.uk/covid-19-research/plasma-donors/who-can-donate-plasma/.

By

NHS leaders reassuring message to women about the safety of attending for routine breast screening

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and women in the Midlands are being encouraged to attend for their regular breast screening appointment if they are contacted by screening services.

Coronavirus (Covid-19) has had a major impact on the NHS, including on breast screening services and, as a result, women may have waited longer than they usually do to be invited for regular screening.  Now that services are getting up and running again, they can feel reassured by the safety measures that have been put in place.

Breast screening aims to find cancers early using an x-ray test called a mammogram. This can spot cancers when they are too small to see or feel. To protect everyone against the possible spread of Covid-19, screening providers will ensure that social distancing can be observed, and additional infection control procedures have been introduced. This includes the wearing of personal protective equipment by staff such as face masks and gloves.

Enhanced infection control measures mean that appointments may be held at a clinic different to the usual venue and these may take longer than usual. Women are also being asked to wear a face covering at their appointment, unless there is a reason that they cannot do so.

Dr Ash Banerjee, Screening and Immunisations Lead for NHS England and Improvement in the Midlands says:

“Measures are in place to ensure that essential, routine screening can be delivered safely. About one in eight women in the UK are diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime, so it’s important to attend for routine screening when this is offered.

 “As long as you or any member of your household are not displaying symptoms of coronavirus and are not self-isolating, breast screening should take place as normal. 

“Please attend for your screening appointment if you are contacted by a breast screening provider and informed that you are due for your routine screen.”

About routine breast screening:

After screening, about 1 in 25 women will be called back for further assessment. Being called back does not mean that someone has cancer. The first mammogram may have been unclear. About 1 in 4 women who are called back for further assessment are diagnosed with breast cancer.

As the likelihood of getting breast cancer increases with age, all women aged from 50 to their 71st birthday who are registered with a GP are automatically invited for breast screening every 3 years. Women may be eligible for breast screening before the age of 50 if they have a very high risk of developing breast cancer.

Anyone worried about breast cancer symptoms should speak to their GP as soon as possible.

In 2018/19:

  • 71.7% of women accepted their breast screening invitation (aged 50 to 70) and 2.23 million women were screened
  • 19,558 women had cancers detected by screening (a rate of 8.8 cases per 1,000 women screened)
  • detection rates were highest for small invasive cancers (3.5 per 1,000 women)
  • detection rates were lowest for non-invasive or micro-invasive cancers (1.8 per 1,000 women).